What Does The Reverse Of Your Embroidery Look Like?

It is just as important to try and create neat stitching and a neat finish on the reverse side of your work as it is on the front side of your work. Admittedly this can be very difficult to achieve but something we should strive to do.

This piece of embroidery stitched by my late mum is quite old and for years it was used as a display piece and was not behind glass but open to the elements in her then wool, handicrafts and haberdashery shop. Considering it is was stitched in the 1980’s it is still in a reasonable condition even though I recently placed it in my washing machine and pressed the delicate hand wash button and prayed.

The Reverse Of Your Embroidery

This is the reverse side of Mum’s embroidery and look at how neat it is. You can almost see the complete picture from behind. There is no evidence of knots being used and unfortunately I cannot comment on which method Mum used to start and finish each piece of thread. I know of a couple of ways to start stitching without using a permanent knot, however both methods do initially require a temporary knot.

Start Stitching Without a Permanent Knot

1.Thread your needle and place a knot at the end of your thread. Insert your needle into the fabric to begin your embroidery stitches and on the first stitch leave approximately 3 to 5 inches of thread, at the back of the fabric and above the knot. Be careful with the first few stitches not to catch the loose thread as the knot should weigh the thread down a little. When you have finished, cut the knot and place the thread through the eye of the needle and weave the thread through the back of the worked stitches. To make this finishing extra secure you may wish to go over 2 or 3 stitches and double back by repeating this same application.

2.Thread your needle and place a knot at the end of your thread. Insert your needle through the fabric with the front of the fabric facing you leaving approximately 3 to 5 inches of thread, at the front of the work and above the knot. Start your embroidery stitches over the 3 to 5 inches of thread making sure your stitching fully secures and covers the 3 to 5inches of thread. Once you reach the knot and your thread is covered, cut the knot. This application is ideal when you are using filling-in solid stitches such as Long and Short Stitch and Satin Stitch.

Finish Stitching Without a Permanent Knot

Once you come to the end of your thread and the needle is at the back of your fabric, weave the needle under the last few stitches worked and cut the thread. If your thread is long enough and to make the finishing off more secure you may wish to go over 2 or 3 stitches and double back by repeating this same application.